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safe Lifting technique

Được đăng lên bởi Kien Trung Nguyen
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Safe Lifting Technique
Experts do not often agree as to what constitutes a truly safe lifting method, and in reality
there is no single correct way to lift. The method espoused for the past several decades
(bend the knees and not the back) has not been particularly effective in reducing the
incidence or severity of low back injury by itself. Lifting, in practice, is highly dependent
on the particulars of the task at hand.
Expert opinions differ as to which lifting methodology poses the least physical threat to
the handler. The biomechanical approach indicates that a squat lift (knees and hips bent
with the back more or less straight) places the least stress on the back. Proponents of the
physiological approach to lifting argue that the stoop lift (legs straight with the back bent)
is less physiologically stressful than the squat lift. And the psychophysical approach to
lifting indicates that a freestyle lift is least taxing.
A freestyle lift is described as a semi squat posture, which allows the handler to rest the
load on the thigh(s) during the lift.
However, there is general agreement on some fundamental principles that should help
protect materials handlers when lifting under most circumstances.
Typically, when lifting the handler should:
1. Test the weight of the load, its weight distribution and stability within the container.
This minimizes the chance of being surprised by an unexpectedly heavy weight or having
to contend with a shifting load.
2. Get help from someone or use a mechanical assist device whenever very heavy or
awkward loads must be handled. When lifting with a partner, the team should
communicate and coordinate the task (when lifting, moving, and lowering the object).
3. Know where the load is going. Make sure the path is free from obstructions or hazards,
and ensure that space is available at the destination to set the object down.
4. Be positioned close to the load, with the feet flat and stable. Keep the load as close to
the body as possible so that the center of gravity is as close to the spine as possible.
Moving the load away from the torso (horizontally and/or vertically) greatly
increases the load to the back, shoulders, and arms, and, therefore, increases the risk of
injury.
5. Grasp the object with the whole hand using a power grip whenever possible. Avoid
pinching with the fingertips to hold an object. Ideally, the handler should be able to use
both hands on handles or handholds to pick up the load.
6. Move with natural, smo...
Safe Lifting Technique
Experts do not often agree as to what constitutes a truly safe lifting method, and in reality
there is no single correct way to lift. The method espoused for the past several decades
(bend the knees and not the back) has not been particularly effective in reducing the
incidence or severity of low back injury by itself. Lifting, in practice, is highly dependent
on the particulars of the task at hand.
Expert opinions differ as to which lifting methodology poses the least physical threat to
the handler. The biomechanical approach indicates that a squat lift (knees and hips bent
with the back more or less straight) places the least stress on the back. Proponents of the
physiological approach to lifting argue that the stoop lift (legs straight with the back bent)
is less physiologically stressful than the squat lift. And the psychophysical approach to
lifting indicates that a freestyle lift is least taxing.
A freestyle lift is described as a semi squat posture, which allows the handler to rest the
load on the thigh(s) during the lift.
However, there is general agreement on some fundamental principles that should help
protect materials handlers when lifting under most circumstances.
Typically, when lifting the handler should:
1. Test the weight of the load, its weight distribution and stability within the container.
This minimizes the chance of being surprised by an unexpectedly heavy weight or having
to contend with a shifting load.
2. Get help from someone or use a mechanical assist device whenever very heavy or
awkward loads must be handled. When lifting with a partner, the team should
communicate and coordinate the task (when lifting, moving, and lowering the object).
3. Know where the load is going. Make sure the path is free from obstructions or hazards,
and ensure that space is available at the destination to set the object down.
4. Be positioned close to the load, with the feet flat and stable. Keep the load as close to
the body as possible so that the center of gravity is as close to the spine as possible.
Moving the load away from the torso (horizontally and/or vertically) greatly
increases the load to the back, shoulders, and arms, and, therefore, increases the risk of
injury.
5. Grasp the object with the whole hand using a power grip whenever possible. Avoid
pinching with the fingertips to hold an object. Ideally, the handler should be able to use
both hands on handles or handholds to pick up the load.
6. Move with natural, smooth, continuous, and balanced motions while avoiding rapid,
jerky, or unbalanced lifts. Move the feet to avoid twisting the torso and to maintain
balance and stability during the lift, if necessary.
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safe Lifting technique - Người đăng: Kien Trung Nguyen
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