Ktl-icon-tai-lieu

Review Starch blend Waterschoot

Được đăng lên bởi Tô Thành Huy
Số trang: 13 trang   |   Lượt xem: 284 lần   |   Lượt tải: 0 lần
Starch/Stärke 2015, 67, 1–13

1

DOI 10.1002/star.201300214

REVIEW

Starch blends and their physicochemical properties
Jasmien Waterschoot, Sara V. Gomand, Ellen Fierens and Jan A. Delcour
Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Biochemistry, Leuven Food Science and Nutrition Research Centre (LFoRCe), KU Leuven,
Leuven, Belgium

In this paper, the current knowledge on properties of starch blends is critically reviewed. Received: September 10, 2013
Nowadays, chemical modifications are commonly applied to modify starch properties. However, Revised: November 12, 2013
industry calls for alternatives for chemically modified starches to address the consumer’s demand Accepted: November 15, 2013
for natural food systems. A simple way to impact starch properties is by blending different
starches. In some blends, interactions lead to unexpected gelatinization, pasting, gel texture, and
retrogradation properties (non-additive effect), while an additive effect occurs when the behavior
of the blend corresponds to what can be expected based on the individual components. Analysis of
different studies describing the physicochemical properties of blends brings insight into the role
of botanical origin, amylose content, starch-to-water ratio, ratio of starches in the blend, etc. in
the behavior of the blends. Gelatinization occurs mostly independently in excess water, while at
intermediate water content more non-additive behavior is recorded. Pasting, rheological, and
textural properties show primarily non-additive effects while retrogradation of starch blends
occurs mainly in an additive way. Large differences in granule size and swelling power between
the starches in a blend lead to uneven moisture distribution during heating of the starch
suspension, which results in a different behavior of the blend than what would be expected based
on the behavior of the individual starches.
Keywords:
Gelatinization / Gel texture / Pasting / Retrogradation / Starch blends

1

Introduction

Starch is the most important source of carbohydrates in the
human diet [1]. It consists of both amylose (typically 18–33%)
and amylopectin (typically 67–82%). Both polymers consist of
a-D-glucose units connected through a-1,4 linkages and a-1,6
linkages. Amylose, in essence a linear polymer, contains only
occasional a-1,6 branch points, while amylopectin is larger
and much more branched, with 5–6% a-1,6 linkages [2].
Starch is present as granules, the size and shape of which
depend on the botanical origin. G...
REVIEW
Starch blends and their physicochemical properties
Jasmien Waterschoot, Sara V. Gomand, Ellen Fierens and Jan A. Delcour
Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Biochemistry, Leuven Food Science and Nutrition Research Centre (LFoRCe), KU Leuven,
Leuven, Belgium
In this paper, the current knowledge on properties of starch blends is critically reviewed.
Nowadays, chemical modications are commonly applied to modify starch properties. However,
industry calls for alternatives for chemically modied starches to address the consumers demand
for natural food systems. A simple way to impact starch properties is by blending different
starches. In some blends, interactions lead to unexpected gelatinization, pasting, gel texture, and
retrogradation properties (non-additive effect), while an additive effect occurs when the behavior
of the blend corresponds to what can be expected based on the individual components. Analysis of
different studies describing the physicochemical properties of blends brings insight into the role
of botanical origin, amylose content, starch-to-water ratio, ratio of starches in the blend, etc. in
the behavior of the blends. Gelatinization occurs mostly independently in excess water, while at
intermediate water content more non-additive behavior is recorded. Pasting, rheological, and
textural properties show primarily non-additive effects while retrogradation of starch blends
occurs mainly in an additive way. Large differences in granule size and swelling power between
the starches in a blend lead to uneven moisture distribution during heating of the starch
suspension, which results in a different behavior of the blend than what would be expected based
on the behavior of the individual starches.
Received: September 10, 2013
Revised: November 12, 2013
Accepted: November 15, 2013
Keywords:
Gelatinization / Gel texture / Pasting / Retrogradation / Starch blends
1 Introduction
Starch is the most important source of carbohydrates in the
human diet [1]. It consists of both amylose (typically 1833%)
and amylopectin (typically 6782%). Both polymers consist of
a-
D-glucose units connected through a-1,4 linkages and a-1,6
linkages. Amylose, in essence a linear polymer, contains only
occasional a-1,6 branch points, while amylopectin is larger
and much more branched, with 56% a-1,6 linkages [2].
Starch is present as granules, the size and shape of which
depend on the botanical origin. Granule sizes range from
several mm for rice and amaranth starches up to more than
100 mm for potato and canna starches (Table 1).
As a component of bread, potatoes, rice and pasta, starch is
a major energy source [1]. Because of its functional
properties, starch is widely used in sauces, soups, bakery
and dairy products, candy, etc. However, the use of native
starches in industrial applications is rather limited because of
their low resistance to shear, high temperatures and acid,
their suboptimal gelling capacity, their large tendency to
retrograde and/or their low freezethaw stability. Chemical
cross-linking or substitution improves the functional proper-
ties of starch in a number of applications [35]. Cross-linking
introduces additional covalent bonds (e.g. phosphate diester
linkages or adipate diester linkages) between starch mole-
cules. This stabilizes and strengthens the granules. Substitu-
tion (e.g. acetylation or hydroxypropylation) introduces bulky
substituents on the starch chains, thereby weakening the
granular structure and reducing the extent of amylose and
amylopectin crystallization in gelatinized starch [3, 6]. As part
of a general trend towards more natural food systems,
alternatives for chemically modied starches are being
Correspondence: Dr. Jasmien Waterschoot, Laboratory of Food
Chemistry and Biochemistry, Leuven Food Science and Nutrition
Research Centre (LFoRCe), KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 20
box 2463, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium
E-mail: jasmien.waterschoot@biw.kuleuven.be
Fax: þ32-16-32-19-97
Abbreviations: HMT, heat-moisture treated; PNMR, pulsed nuclear
magnetic resonance; RVA, rapid visco analyzer
DOI 10.1002/star.201300214Starch/Stärke 2015, 67,113
1
ß 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim www.starch-journal.com
Review Starch blend Waterschoot - Trang 2
Để xem tài liệu đầy đủ. Xin vui lòng
Review Starch blend Waterschoot - Người đăng: Tô Thành Huy
5 Tài liệu rất hay! Được đăng lên bởi - 1 giờ trước Đúng là cái mình đang tìm. Rất hay và bổ ích. Cảm ơn bạn!
13 Vietnamese
Review Starch blend Waterschoot 9 10 990