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American Helps Reunite Trafficked Nepalese Children With Families (VOA Special English 20120219).pdf

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Welcome to THIS IS AMERICA in VOA Special English. I'm Faith Lapidus.
And I'm Christopher Cruise. This week on our program, we meet an American man working to
reunite children with their families in Nepal. Then, we have a story on the Girl Scouts of the USA -the organization is celebrating a big birthday. And, finally, we look at what some people are willing
to do for another member of the family: their pets.
Conor Grennan was nearly thirty years old when he decided he wanted to do something different
with his life. He left his job and used his life's savings to plan a trip around the world. He began
with Nepal near the end of its ten-year civil war.
There, the American volunteered at an orphanage for three months. Eighteen young children were
living in the Little Princes Children's Home near Kathmandu, the capital. Mr. Grennan helped take
care of the children and taught them English.
CONOR GRENNAN: "I was very worried about it because I had never really spent much time with
children before. As soon as I got into that world, I really enjoyed it. We became very, very close by
the end of my time there."
He decided to return to Nepal a year later, in two thousand six, after the war ended. He discovered
then that the children were not really orphans but the victims of human traffickers.
CONOR GRENNAN: "All these children had parents. They weren't orphans at all. These children
had been actually taken because their parents feared that they would be abducted by the rebels.
Their parents had actually paid these traffickers not knowing that the traffickers intended to sell
their children. They thought they would take their children to protect them."
The children had been sold and then abandoned, and ended up at the Little Princes Children's
Home.
Conor Grennan now had a new goal. He set out to help reconnect Nepalese families with children
sold into trafficking.
CONOR GRENNAN: "There were so many children, probably fifteen thousand children that were
affected by this problem."
Mr. Grennan became an advocate for those children. In his book "Little Princes," he explains why.
CONOR GRENNAN: "It's amazing how a problem can really come to life when you get to know
the people who are victims of these problems."
He says he wrote the memoir to help raise awareness about child trafficking, but also to show that
anyone can make a difference.
Mr. Grennan ...
Welcome to THIS IS AMERICA in VOA Special English. I'm Faith Lapidus.
And I'm Christopher Cruise. This week on our program, we meet an American man working to
reunite children with their families in Nepal. Then, we have a story on the Girl Scouts of the USA --
the organization is celebrating a big birthday. And, finally, we look at what some people are willing
to do for another member of the family: their pets.
Conor Grennan was nearly thirty years old when he decided he wanted to do something different
with his life. He left his job and used his life's savings to plan a trip around the world. He began
with Nepal near the end of its ten-year civil war.
There, the American volunteered at an orphanage for three months. Eighteen young children were
living in the Little Princes Children's Home near Kathmandu, the capital. Mr. Grennan helped take
care of the children and taught them English.
CONOR GRENNAN: "I was very worried about it because I had never really spent much time with
children before. As soon as I got into that world, I really enjoyed it. We became very, very close by
the end of my time there."
He decided to return to Nepal a year later, in two thousand six, after the war ended. He discovered
then that the children were not really orphans but the victims of human traffickers.
CONOR GRENNAN: "All these children had parents. They weren't orphans at all. These children
had been actually taken because their parents feared that they would be abducted by the rebels.
Their parents had actually paid these traffickers not knowing that the traffickers intended to sell
their children. They thought they would take their children to protect them."
The children had been sold and then abandoned, and ended up at the Little Princes Children's
Home.
Conor Grennan now had a new goal. He set out to help reconnect Nepalese families with children
sold into trafficking.
CONOR GRENNAN: "There were so many children, probably fifteen thousand children that were
affected by this problem."
Mr. Grennan became an advocate for those children. In his book "Little Princes," he explains why.
CONOR GRENNAN: "It's amazing how a problem can really come to life when you get to know
the people who are victims of these problems."
He says he wrote the memoir to help raise awareness about child trafficking, but also to show that
anyone can make a difference.
Mr. Grennan established a nonprofit group in Kathmandu called Next Generation Nepal. The
organization works to find lost children and reunite them with their families. So far, he says, his
group has reconnected three hundred Nepalese children with their relatives.
American Helps Reunite Trafficked Nepalese Children With Families... http://www.manythings.org/voa/usa/541.html
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