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New Photography Shows Different Side of Annie Leibovitz (VOA Special English 20120205).pdf

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Welcome to THIS IS AMERICA in VOA Special English. I'm Shirley Griffith.
JUNE SIMMS: And I'm June Simms. This week on our program, we visit a new exhibit of work by
photographer Annie Leibovitz. Then, we tell you about a collection of works by women performing
traditional American music. And, later, we go under the streets of New York City to hear the work
of subway musicians.
Annie Leibovitz has been a photographer for forty years. She is famous for her photographs of
people, especially famous people. She says she will continue doing portraits of people, but also
wants to take other kinds of photos.
A new exhibit at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington shows a different side to
her work. She spent two years taking pictures without any people in them. Many are photos of
places in the United States where famous people lived in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
There are photos of homes and personal items that belonged to people including artists,
scientists, photographers and a president. The exhibit is called "Pilgrimage."
Ms. Leibovitz explains that from two thousand nine to two thousand eleven, she took photos of
places that moved her emotionally. She says the collection represents a renewal of her spirit. Her
lover, the author Susan Sontag, died of cancer at the end of two thousand four. Ms. Leibovitz had
financial troubles and almost lost control of her photo archives.
ANNIE LEIBOVITZ: "There's some searching going on. I discovered some things about myself
which were really comforting."
Ms. Leibovitz says she was inspired by Georgia O'Keefe, the twentieth century artist. She traveled
to New Mexico to photograph the houses where O'Keeffe lived and a box of handmade pastels
that she drew with.
Ms. Leibovitz also captured images of items that belonged to President Abraham Lincoln. These
include his hat and gloves from when he was assassinated in eighteen-sixty-five.
Andy Grundberg curated the exhibit for the museum.
ANDY GRUNDBERG: "What she's really trying to do is evoke the presence of people, in a way,
despite their absence."
He calls the exhibit "a portrait of Leibovitz."
ANDY GRUNDBERG: "This is a way of understanding how Annie Leibovitz thinks about the world
through the pictures that she's taken of people and places that are important to her."
Annie Leibovitz told reporters that she had not planned to focus on ...
Welcome to THIS IS AMERICA in VOA Special English. I'm Shirley Griffith.
JUNE SIMMS: And I'm June Simms. This week on our program, we visit a new exhibit of work by
photographer Annie Leibovitz. Then, we tell you about a collection of works by women performing
traditional American music. And, later, we go under the streets of New York City to hear the work
of subway musicians.
A
nnie Leibovitz has been a photographer for forty years. She is famous for her photographs o
f
people, especially famous people. She says she will continue doing portraits of people, but also
wants to take other kinds of photos.
A new exhibit at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington shows a different side to
her work. She spent two years taking pictures without any people in them. Many are photos o
f
places in the United States where famous people lived in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
There are photos of homes and personal items that belonged to people including artists,
scientists, photographers and a president. The exhibit is called "Pilgrimage."
Ms. Leibovitz explains that from two thousand nine to two thousand eleven, she took photos o
f
places that moved her emotionally. She says the collection represents a renewal of her spirit. He
r
lover, the author Susan Sontag, died of cancer at the end of two thousand four. Ms. Leibovitz had
financial troubles and almost lost control of her photo archives.
A
NNIE LEIBOVITZ: "There's some searching going on. I discovered some things about mysel
f
which were really comforting."
Ms. Leibovitz says she was inspired by Georgia O'Keefe, the twentieth century artist. She traveled
to New Mexico to photograph the houses where O'Keeffe lived and a box of handmade pastels
that she drew with.
Ms. Leibovitz also captured images of items that belonged to President Abraham Lincoln. These
include his hat and gloves from when he was assassinated in eighteen-sixty-five.
Andy Grundberg curated the exhibit for the museum.
ANDY GRUNDBERG: "What she's really trying to do is evoke the presence of people, in a way,
despite their absence."
He calls the exhibit "a portrait of Leibovitz."
ANDY GRUNDBERG: "This is a way of understanding how Annie Leibovitz thinks about the world
through the pictures that she's taken of people and places that are important to her."
Annie Leibovitz told reporters that she had not planned to focus on people from the past.
ANNIE LEIBOVITZ: "What really drew me to them, I think that they stand out. I thrive on history. I
love it."
One person she focused on was Annie Oakley. Annie Oakley was famous in the late eighteen
N
ew Photography Shows Different Side of Annie Leibovitz (VOA Spe... http://www.manythings.org/voa/usa/539.html
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