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Adverbs Of Degree

Được đăng lên bởi Le Hong Mai
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USES OF ADVERBS OF DEGREE
1. Modifying an adjective or adverb
a. We can use an adverb of degree before some adjectives and adverbs.
+ Adjective:
- It's very cold. I'm so tired.
- You're absolutely right.
- These are rather expensive.
- We're a bit busy today.
- It wasn't at all interesting.
+ Adverb:
- I come here quite often. I saw her fairly recently.
- We hardly ever go out. He agreed somewhat reluctantly.
Here are some common adverbs of degree.
Full degree: completely, totally, absolutely, entirely, quite
Large degree: very, extremely, really, awfully, terribly
Medium degree: rather, fairly, quite, pretty, somewhat
Small degree: a little, a bit, slightly
Negative: hardly, scarcely, at all
Others: so, as; too; more, most, less, least
We can also use a fraction or percentage.
- The bottle is only half full.
- The forecast was eighty per cent accurate.
NOTE
a. We use completely, totally, absolutely etc with words expressing a full or large degree.
- This tin opener is completely useless. (useless = absolutely no use)
- We are absolutely delighted at the news. (delighted = very pleased)
We do not normally use very or extremely with these words.
- It's very unsatisfactory. NOT It's very useless.
- We were extremely pleased. NOT We were extremely delighted:
Some words that do not normally take very or extremely are:
amazed, amazing, appalled, appalling, awful, complete, delighted, dreadful, essential, false, fascinated,
horrible, ideal, impossible, incredible, magnificent, marvellous, perfect, terrible, terrific, useless.
b. After a phrase with very we can put indeed for extra emphasis.
- It's very cold indeed today.
c. We often use very with a negative.
- These photos aren't very good.
This is more usual than These photos aren't good or These photos are bad.

d. Instead of really we can use real in informal speech, especially in American English.
- It's real cold today.

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e. Pretty and a bit are informal.
f. Somewhat, a little, a bit and slightly have an unfavourable sense.
- The carriage was somewhat crowded.
- I felt a bit sick.
But we can use them with comparatives in a favourable sense.
- I felt a bit better/somewhat more cheerful.
g. At all can also go in end position.
- It wasn't interesting at all.
h. We can use at all to emphasize a negative.
- Frankenstein wasn't the name of the monster at all.
- There was nowhere at all to park.
Here are some other phrases with a similar meaning.
- The operation was not a success by any means. I'm not in t...
USES OF ADVERBS OF DEGREE
1. Modifying an adjective or adverb
a. We can use an adverb of degree before some adjectives and adverbs.
+ Adjective:
- It's very cold. I'm so tired.
- You're absolutely right.
- These are rather expensive.
- We're a bit busy today.
- It wasn't at all interesting.
+ Adverb:
- I come here quite often. I saw her fairly recently.
- We hardly ever go out. He agreed somewhat reluctantly.
Here are some common adverbs of degree.
Full degree: completely, totally, absolutely, entirely, quite
Large degree: very, extremely, really, awfully, terribly
Medium degree: rather, fairly, quite, pretty, somewhat
Small degree: a little, a bit, slightly
Negative: hardly, scarcely, at all
Others: so, as; too; more, most, less, least
We can also use a fraction or percentage.
- The bottle is only half full.
- The forecast was eighty per cent accurate.
NOTE
a. We use completely, totally, absolutely etc with words expressing a full or large degree.
- This tin opener is completely useless. (useless = absolutely no use)
- We are absolutely delighted at the news. (delighted = very pleased)
We do not normally use very or extremely with these words.
- It's very unsatisfactory. NOT It's very useless.
- We were extremely pleased. NOT We were extremely delighted:
Some words that do not normally take very or extremely are:
amazed, amazing, appalled, appalling, awful, complete, delighted, dreadful, essential, false, fascinated,
horrible, ideal, impossible, incredible, magnificent, marvellous, perfect, terrible, terrific, useless.
b. After a phrase with very we can put indeed for extra emphasis.
- It's very cold indeed today.
c. We often use very with a negative.
- These photos aren't very good.
This is more usual than These photos aren't good or These photos are bad.
d. Instead of really we can use real in informal speech, especially in American English.
- It's real cold today.
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