Ktl-icon-tai-lieu

Blue Mountains & Southeast Coast

Được đăng lên bởi ke-toan
Số trang: 7 trang   |   Lượt xem: 523 lần   |   Lượt tải: 0 lần
© Lonely Planet Publications
110

lonelyplanet.com

HISTORY

Kissing the sky over the eastern half of Jamaica, the majestic Blue Mountains throw the rest of
the island into sharp relief. Barely an hour’s drive from Kingston, their slopes, crags and fern
forests seem light years from the capital’s gritty streetscape. Some 2000m above sea level,
the ruggedness of the mountains forms the perfect counterpoint to beachside hedonism.
Hiking in the Blue Mountains is the best way to get to know them. Climbing Blue Mountain Peak rewards with striking panoramas (weather permitting) across the entire island; less
arduous treks to Cinchona Gardens or through the Holywell Recreation Area offer wonderful
samples of the region’s plantlife. Sixty-five distinct species of orchid are among the more than
200 endemic plants that grace the mountains. The bird-watching here is equally stunning –
look out for the yellow-billed parrot and the streamertail hummingbird (also known as the
doctor bird). If you’re really lucky, you may catch sight of the endangered giant swallowtail
butterfly, the second largest butterfly on earth.
As for human life, you’ll find the residents of the area west of the peak preoccupied with
growing one of Jamaica’s most famous crops: coffee. Several working plantations reveal the
nuances of the cultivation process, culminating in a cup or two of Blue Mountain Coffee –
which tastes even more heavenly when you can smell the beans from a nearby field.
Largely ignored by tourists, the parish of St Thomas lies in the shadow of the Blue Mountains. Site of the 1865 Morant Bay Rebellion, it is home to the ramshackle old spa town
of Bath. If you have time for exploration, you should definitely try to make it through the
mangrove fields to the lighthouse at Morant Point, the island’s easternmost tip.
HIGHLIGHTS

With their dense primary forests and forbidding topography, the prospect of life
in the Blue Mountains has discouraged
all but the most determined settlers over
the centuries. During the 17th and 18th
centuries, these same formidable qualities
made the territory the perfect hideout for
the Windward Maroons, who from their remote stronghold at Nanny Town resisted
enslavement and British colonialism for
more than 100 years. But this region’s primary claim to fame has always been coffee
cultivation; it has been a mainstay since
the very first coffee factories were erected
around Clydesdale in the mid-18th century. Meanwhile, back down at sea level,
the southe...
BLUE MOUNTAINS &
SOUTHEAST COAST
BLUE MOUNTAINS &
SOUTHEAST COAST
lonelyplanet.com BLUE MOUNTAINS •• Activities
© Lonely Planet Publications
Kissing the sky over the eastern half of Jamaica, the majestic Blue Mountains throw the rest of
the island into sharp relief. Barely an hour’s drive from Kingston, their slopes, crags and fern
forests seem light years from the capital’s gritty streetscape. Some 2000m above sea level,
the ruggedness of the mountains forms the perfect counterpoint to beachside hedonism.
Hiking in the Blue Mountains is the best way to get to know them. Climbing Blue Moun-
tain Peak rewards with striking panoramas (weather permitting) across the entire island; less
arduous treks to Cinchona Gardens or through the Holywell Recreation Area offer wonderful
samples of the region’s plantlife. Sixty-five distinct species of orchid are among the more than
200 endemic plants that grace the mountains. The bird-watching here is equally stunning –
look out for the yellow-billed parrot and the streamertail hummingbird (also known as the
doctor bird). If you’re really lucky, you may catch sight of the endangered giant swallowtail
butterfly, the second largest butterfly on earth.
As for human life, you’ll find the residents of the area west of the peak preoccupied with
growing one of Jamaica’s most famous crops: coffee. Several working plantations reveal the
nuances of the cultivation process, culminating in a cup or two of Blue Mountain Coffee –
which tastes even more heavenly when you can smell the beans from a nearby field.
Largely ignored by tourists, the parish of St Thomas lies in the shadow of the Blue Moun-
tains. Site of the 1865 Morant Bay Rebellion, it is home to the ramshackle old spa town
of Bath. If you have time for exploration, you should definitely try to make it through the
mangrove fields to the lighthouse at Morant Point, the island’s easternmost tip.
Blue Mountains &
Southeast Coast
HISTORY
With their dense primary forests and for-
bidding topography, the prospect of life
in the Blue Mountains has discouraged
all but the most determined settlers over
the centuries. During the 17th and 18th
centuries, these same formidable qualities
made the territory the perfect hideout for
the Windward Maroons, who from their re-
mote stronghold at Nanny Town resisted
enslavement and British colonialism for
more than 100 years. But this region’s pri-
mary claim to fame has always been coffee
cultivation; it has been a mainstay since
the very first coffee factories were erected
around Clydesdale in the mid-18th cen-
tury. Meanwhile, back down at sea level,
the southeast coast of St Thomas parish is
notable for its long history of protest and
rebellion, and the independent spirit of the
region has kept it at odds with the govern-
ment even up to this day.
CLIMATE
Moisture-laden trade winds blowing in
from the northeast spill much of their ac-
cumulation on the Blue Mountains, which
forms a rain shadow over Kingston and the
southern parishes. The temperature drops
1°C to 2°C for every 300m rise in elevation
(indeed, it can freeze in the early morn-
ing above 1700m). From June through to
September you’ll experience the best weather
for exploring.
St Thomas parish, like Kingston, lies in
the rain shadow and there’s far less precipi-
tation than up in the Blue Mountains.
GETTING THERE & AROUND
The Blue Mountains are best explored by
private car. From Kingston’s eastern fringe,
public transportation runs from Papine,
but service is disorganized and delays and
cancellations are frequent. Public transporta-
tion is far more predictable on the southeast
coast along the A4 road.
BLUE MOUNTAINS
Deriving their name from the azure haze
that settles lazily around their peaks, this
45km-long mountain range looms high
above the eastern parishes of St Andrew,
St Thomas, Portland and St Mary. The
Blue Mountains were formed during the
Cretaceous Period (somewhere between
144 and 65 million years ago) and are the
island’s oldest feature. Highest of the high-
lights, Blue Mountain Peak reaches 2256m
above sea level, and no visit to the area
should neglect a predawn hike to its sum-
mit for a sunrise view.
Unsurprisingly, the Blue Mountains’
largely unspoiled character owes much
to the difficulty in navigating around the
area. Roads are narrow and – as often as
not – dirt tracks that are utterly impos-
sible to pass without 4WD, especially after
heavy rains. If you are spending time in
the area, contacting a tour guide or mak-
ing arrangements with your hotel are
highly advisable.
Activities
HIKING
The Blue Mountains are a hiker’s dream,
and dozens of trails lace the hills. Many are
overgrown, but others remain the mainstay
of communication for locals.
By far the most popular route is to ‘The
Peak,’ which in Jamaica always means Blue
Mountain Peak. The steep and exhilarating
trail is well maintained.
These trails (called ‘tracks’ locally) are
rarely marked. When asking for directions
from locals, remember that ‘a few chains’
can mean several kilometers, while ‘jus
a likkle way’ may in fact be a few hours
of hiking. Within the Blue Mountains-
John Crow National Park, hiking trails
are categorized as guided, nonguided
and wilderness.
A Hiker’s Guide to the Blue Mountains,
by Bill Wilcox, is an indispensable guide for
serious hikers.
Guided Hikes
Guides can be hired from most hotels in
the area for about US$35 for a half day, and
US$45 for a full day. Freelance guides hire
themselves out at Penlyne Castle, Hagley
Gap and Mavis Bank. On overnight trips
you’re expected to pay for the guide’s food
and accommodations.
In addition to others, the following offer
guided hikes:
Forres Park Guest House & Farm (www.forrespark
.com; Kingston
x
927-5957; Mavis Bank
x
927-8275) A
good option for custom hiking trips. See p118 .
AREA: 750 SQ KM
STRAWBERRY HILL DEC AVERAGE HIGH TEMPERATURE: 23.3°C
HIGHLIGHTS
Strawberry Hill Reward yourself with a meal, spa treatment or night of romance at one of
Jamaica’s best hotels ( p114 )
Blue Mountain Peak Set out before dawn
for the greatest high in Jamaica ( p119 )
Old Tavern Estate See how a red berry is
transformed into the world’s best coffee
bean ( p116 )
Cycling from Hardwar Gap Quicken your
pulse with a rip-roaring descent from the
high mountains, through coffee plantations
and villages ( p113 )
Morant Point Lighthouse Find your way to
this remote beacon providing a privileged
view of coast and mountains ( p122 )
Gap
Hardwar
Hill
Strawberry
Lighthouse
Morant Point
Estate
Old Tavern
Blue Mountain Peak
110 111
Blue Mountains & Southeast Coast - Trang 2
Để xem tài liệu đầy đủ. Xin vui lòng
Blue Mountains & Southeast Coast - Người đăng: ke-toan
5 Tài liệu rất hay! Được đăng lên bởi - 1 giờ trước Đúng là cái mình đang tìm. Rất hay và bổ ích. Cảm ơn bạn!
7 Vietnamese
Blue Mountains & Southeast Coast 9 10 963