Ktl-icon-tai-lieu

Crete-4-history-food

Được đăng lên bởi hoc-anh-van
Số trang: 29 trang   |   Lượt xem: 1502 lần   |   Lượt tải: 0 lần
© Lonely Planet Publications
23

History
Crete’s colourful history goes back 5000 years and is evident across the island,
from ancient palaces and Roman cities to spectacular Byzantine churches,
Venetian fortresses and Ottoman buildings. Crete’s prominent place in world
history is a legacy of the illustrious Minoan civilisation that was living in
grand palaces when the rest of Europe was still in primitive huts. Crete has
also left an indelible mark in the popular imagination because of its prominent place in ancient Greek mythology. It was where Rhea gave birth to Zeus
and hid him from his child-gobbling father, and it was Zeus’ son Minos who
became the legendary King of Minoan Crete. Icarus and Daedalus launched
their ill-fated flight in Crete, while Theseus made the voyage from Athens
to Crete to slay the Minotaur in the famous labyrinth.
Crete’s more recent history has been characterised by war and struggle, as the island was a strategic pawn in the battles for control of the
Mediterranean. Crete has been invaded numerous times and ruled by
eight different foreign powers since Minoan times – by the Mycenaeans,
Dorians, Romans, Venetians, Byzantines, Arabs, Ottomans and Germans. That Crete only united with Greece in 1913 explains its enduring
independent spirit.

THE MINOANS
The Minoans were the first advanced civilisation to emerge in Europe
in the Bronze Age, predating the great Mycenaean civilisation on the
Greek mainland. Minoan civilisation drew its inspiration from two great
Middle Eastern civilisations: the Mesopotamian and Egyptian. Immigrants arriving from Anatolia around 3000 BC brought with them the
skills necessary for making bronze, a technological quantum leap that
enabled the emerging Minoans to flourish almost uninterrupted for over
one-and-a-half millennia.
While many aspects of Neolithic life endured during the Early Minoan
period, the advent of bronze allowed the Minoans to build better boats and
thus expand their trade opportunities. Pottery and goldsmithing became
more sophisticated, foreshadowing the subsequent great achievements of
Minoan art, and the island prospered from trade.
Controversy still shrouds the mysterious Minoans. Evidence uncovered in
the grand palaces on Crete indicates they were a peaceful, sophisticated, wellorganised and prosperous civilisation with robust international trade, splendid
architecture and art and seemingly equal status for women. They had highly
developed agriculture, an extensive irrigation syste...
© Lonely Planet Publications
Crete’s colourful history goes back 5000 years and is evident across the island,
from ancient palaces and Roman cities to spectacular Byzantine churches,
Venetian fortresses and Ottoman buildings. Crete’s prominent place in world
history is a legacy of the illustrious Minoan civilisation that was living in
grand palaces when the rest of Europe was still in primitive huts. Crete has
also left an indelible mark in the popular imagination because of its promi-
nent place in ancient Greek mythology. It was where Rhea gave birth to Zeus
and hid him from his child-gobbling father, and it was Zeus’ son Minos who
became the legendary King of Minoan Crete. Icarus and Daedalus launched
their ill-fated flight in Crete, while Theseus made the voyage from Athens
to Crete to slay the Minotaur in the famous labyrinth.
Crete’s more recent history has been characterised by war and strug-
gle, as the island was a strategic pawn in the battles for control of the
Mediterranean. Crete has been invaded numerous times and ruled by
eight different foreign powers since Minoan times – by the Mycenaeans,
Dorians, Romans, Venetians, Byzantines, Arabs, Ottomans and Ger-
mans. That Crete only united with Greece in 1913 explains its enduring
independent spirit.
THE MINOANS
The Minoans were the first advanced civilisation to emerge in Europe
in the Bronze Age, predating the great Mycenaean civilisation on the
Greek mainland. Minoan civilisation drew its inspiration from two great
Middle Eastern civilisations: the Mesopotamian and Egyptian. Immi-
grants arriving from Anatolia around 3000 BC brought with them the
skills necessary for making bronze, a technological quantum leap that
enabled the emerging Minoans to flourish almost uninterrupted for over
one-and-a-half millennia.
While many aspects of Neolithic life endured during the Early Minoan
period, the advent of bronze allowed the Minoans to build better boats and
thus expand their trade opportunities. Pottery and goldsmithing became
more sophisticated, foreshadowing the subsequent great achievements of
Minoan art, and the island prospered from trade.
Controversy still shrouds the mysterious Minoans. Evidence uncovered in
the grand palaces on Crete indicates they were a peaceful, sophisticated, well-
organised and prosperous civilisation with robust international trade, splendid
architecture and art and seemingly equal status for women. They had highly
developed agriculture, an extensive irrigation system as well as advanced
hydraulic sewerage systems. They may have spoken an early Indo-Iranian
H i s t o r y
Crete’s early inhabitants hunt
and fish and engage in ances-
tor worship. Neolithic people
live in caves or wooden houses,
worship female fertility god-
desses, farm, raise livestock
and make primitive pottery.
6500 BC 3000 BC 2000 BC
Immigrants from the North Afri-
can or Levantine mainland arrive
with the skills for making bronze,
heralding the Bronze Age in
Crete. In this Pre-Palatial period,
society changes; the inhabit-
ants begin to trade; pottery and
jewellery making develops.
The first palaces are built in
Knossos, Phaestos, Malia and
Zakros. Minoan civilisation
reaches its peak. Architectural
advances are accompanied by
great strides in pottery pro-
duction techniques. The first
Cretan script emerges.
The mythical Talos, a
bronze giant, is believed
to be the first robot
invented. Hephaestus of-
fered him as a servant to
King Minos. He had one
vein from neck to ankle,
where a bronze nail
retained the blood.
23
Crete-4-history-food - Trang 2
Để xem tài liệu đầy đủ. Xin vui lòng
Crete-4-history-food - Người đăng: hoc-anh-van
5 Tài liệu rất hay! Được đăng lên bởi - 1 giờ trước Đúng là cái mình đang tìm. Rất hay và bổ ích. Cảm ơn bạn!
29 Vietnamese
Crete-4-history-food 9 10 107