Ktl-icon-tai-lieu

Destination Kuala Lumpur, Melaka & Penang

Được đăng lên bởi ky-thuat
Số trang: 5 trang   |   Lượt xem: 438 lần   |   Lượt tải: 0 lần
© Lonely Planet Publications
15

Destination
Kuala Lumpur,
Melaka & Penang
The story of Peninsular Malaysia is painted large in the historic cities of Kuala
Lumpur (KL), Melaka and Penang. Many of the pivotal events in Malaysian
history – the first Chinese settlements, the rise of the Melaka sultans, the
arrival of the British, the declaration of Malaysian independence in 1957 –
took place in these three fascinating cities. Here, the stories of Malaysia’s
diverse ethnic groups and colonial empires are intertwined – South Indian
cooks serve fiery curries from the doorways of Sino-Portuguese houses built
as part of trade deals between European powers and the sultans of Melaka.
The diversity of the peninsula is perhaps Malaysia’s biggest drawcard – this
is not one country but three, the best of Malay, Indian and Chinese culture
united under one flag.
In April 2007 the rulers of the nine Malaysian states selected Sultan Mizan
Zainal Abidin as the 13th king of Malaysia – the first king to be born after
independence from colonial rule. Later the same year Malaysia celebrated 50
years of independence with a string of festivals and special events. However,
Malaysia’s famous policy of unity in diversity is showing signs of strain.
Ever since independence, the Malay community has been strengthening its
control over the government, police and military, and Indian, Chinese and
tribal Malaysians are facing increasing marginalisation and discrimination.
Simultaneously, the syariah (Islamic) courts are growing in power, threatening the secular foundation of Malaysian democracy.
In recent years Malaysia’s sedition laws have been used to detain growing
numbers of bloggers, journalists and other critics of the Malay-dominated
government. In late 2007 police used tear gas and water cannons to break
up antidiscrimination protests by thousands of Malaysian Indians in KL –
the ringleaders were even charged with attempted murder before the government backed down under local and international pressure. The same
year Malaysian Chinese student Wee Meng Chee (aka Namewee) caused a
major political storm by posting a satirical rap criticising the government
to the tune of the Malay national anthem on the video website YouTube
(see p38).
Malaysia’s increasingly strict stance on public morality has also caused a
few casualties – Malaysia’s first reality-TV pop star, Faizal Tahir, was censured for exposing his chest at a concert in early 2008, and the organisers of
a concert by the Pussy...
The story of Peninsular Malaysia is painted large in the historic cities of Kuala
Lumpur (KL), Melaka and Penang. Many of the pivotal events in Malaysian
history – the first Chinese settlements, the rise of the Melaka sultans, the
arrival of the British, the declaration of Malaysian independence in 1957 –
took place in these three fascinating cities. Here, the stories of Malaysia’s
diverse ethnic groups and colonial empires are intertwined – South Indian
cooks serve fiery curries from the doorways of Sino-Portuguese houses built
as part of trade deals between European powers and the sultans of Melaka.
The diversity of the peninsula is perhaps Malaysia’s biggest drawcard – this
is not one country but three, the best of Malay, Indian and Chinese culture
united under one flag.
In April 2007 the rulers of the nine Malaysian states selected Sultan Mizan
Zainal Abidin as the 13th king of Malaysia – the first king to be born after
independence from colonial rule. Later the same year Malaysia celebrated 50
years of independence with a string of festivals and special events. However,
Malaysia’s famous policy of unity in diversity is showing signs of strain.
Ever since independence, the Malay community has been strengthening its
control over the government, police and military, and Indian, Chinese and
tribal Malaysians are facing increasing marginalisation and discrimination.
Simultaneously, the syariah (Islamic) courts are growing in power, threaten-
ing the secular foundation of Malaysian democracy.
In recent years Malaysia’s sedition laws have been used to detain growing
numbers of bloggers, journalists and other critics of the Malay-dominated
government. In late 2007 police used tear gas and water cannons to break
up antidiscrimination protests by thousands of Malaysian Indians in KL –
the ringleaders were even charged with attempted murder before the gov-
ernment backed down under local and international pressure. The same
year Malaysian Chinese student Wee Meng Chee (aka Namewee) caused a
major political storm by posting a satirical rap criticising the government
to the tune of the Malay national anthem on the video website YouTube
(see p38 ).
Malaysia’s increasingly strict stance on public morality has also caused a
few casualties – Malaysia’s first reality-TV pop star, Faizal Tahir, was cen-
sured for exposing his chest at a concert in early 2008, and the organisers of
a concert by the Pussycat Dolls faced a massive fine in 2006 for allowing the
public performance of ‘suggestive dance routines’. Malaysia’s censors also
cited public decency as an excuse for banning Ang Lee’s award-winning gay
love story Brokeback Mountain. All of which is a little ironic considering
that the Malaysian health minister, Chua Soi Lek, was forced to step down
in 2008 after appearing in an amateur pornographic DVD.
Another hot potato in Malaysian politics is economic migration. Migrant
workers are one of the main causes of population growth in Peninsular
Malaysia, placing a growing strain on jobs and resources; the government
is taking an increasingly hard line on illegal workers from India, Thailand,
Indonesia and the Philippines. There’s an inevitable ethnic angle to the
Destination
Kuala Lumpur,
Melaka & Penang
FAST FACTS
Population: Malaysia
27.17 million; Kuala
Lumpur 1.8 million;
Melaka 688,694; Penang
1.31 million
Rate of population
increase: one person
every 56 seconds
Rate of popula-
tion increase due to
international migration:
one person every five
minutes.
GDP: US$12,900
Rate of inflation: 3.2%
Literacy rate: 89%
Private car ownership:
195 cars per 1000 citizens
Average noise level
in Kuala Lumpur: 70
decibels
Hokkien (Fujian Chinese)
speakers in Penang:
638,900
Kristang (pidgin
Portuguese) speakers in
Melaka: 5000
© Lonely Planet Publications
15
Destination Kuala Lumpur, Melaka & Penang - Trang 2
Destination Kuala Lumpur, Melaka & Penang - Người đăng: ky-thuat
5 Tài liệu rất hay! Được đăng lên bởi - 1 giờ trước Đúng là cái mình đang tìm. Rất hay và bổ ích. Cảm ơn bạn!
5 Vietnamese
Destination Kuala Lumpur, Melaka & Penang 9 10 796