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Getting Started

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You can buy, download and
print individual chapters from

Getting Started

this guidebook.
Get Honduras chapters>

WHEN TO GO

Like most tropical countries, Honduras experiences a rainy season and
a dry season, known locally as invierno (winter) and verano (summer),
respectively. In the interior, especially the west and south, the rainy
season runs roughly from May to November. Rains usually come in the
afternoon and last an hour or so. On the north coast and Bay Islands,
the rainy season is later, around September to December, with nortes
(‘northerners’, cool storms from the north) possible into February. Hurricanes are most likely from September to October, though they rarely hit
Honduras directly. However, even a far-off hurricane can send heavy rain
Honduras’ way and can cause flooding or minor mudslides. See climate
charts (p304) for more information.
Travel is easier during the dry season, especially for scuba diving and
trips to La Moskitia. Then again, the forests and countryside are more
lush during the rainy season. February and March are good months to
visit because the weather is fairly stable across the country; the trails
and roads are drying out but the trees and underbrush are still full and
green.

COSTS & MONEY

Honduras is an inexpensive country overall, but a trip here can be pricey
simply because of the activities you’re likely to do, namely diving.
Besides diving, lodging will likely be your biggest expense. Hotel
prices run the gamut in Honduras, the majority being high-budget or
low-midrange, around US$15 to US$25 per night. Budget travelers can
manage lodging for under US$12 per day in popular destinations and
under US$8 in remote areas, though the cheapest hotels can be pretty
grim.
For most travelers, eating out will cost around US$6 to US$8 per
person per meal, once drinks, taxes, and tip are added in. But you can
save money by eating at street food vendors and no-name eateries, and
DON’T LEAVE HOME WITHOUT…
Passport and US cash – universal travel essentials
Sunscreen – very expensive in Honduras
Bug repellent – expensive and can be hard to find
Toiletries – you’ll appreciate having your preferred brands of tampons, pads, condoms,
deodorant, etc
Travel alarm clock – it’s rare to find alarm clocks in hotels, even high-end ones
Copies of important documents – having a copy of your passport and plane tickets will make
replacing them, if necessary, much easier
Toilet paper – an extra roll has saved many a traveler in a pinch
Dive...
WHEN TO GO
Like most tropical countries, Honduras experiences a rainy season and
a dry season, known locally as invierno (winter) and verano (summer),
respectively. In the interior, especially the west and south, the rainy
season runs roughly from May to November. Rains usually come in the
afternoon and last an hour or so. On the north coast and Bay Islands,
the rainy season is later, around September to December, with nortes
(‘northerners’, cool storms from the north) possible into February. Hur-
ricanes are most likely from September to October, though they rarely hit
Honduras directly. However, even a far-off hurricane can send heavy rain
Honduras’ way and can cause flooding or minor mudslides. See climate
charts ( p304 ) for more information.
Travel is easier during the dry season, especially for scuba diving and
trips to La Moskitia. Then again, the forests and countryside are more
lush during the rainy season. February and March are good months to
visit because the weather is fairly stable across the country; the trails
and roads are drying out but the trees and underbrush are still full and
green.
COSTS & MONEY
Honduras is an inexpensive country overall, but a trip here can be pricey
simply because of the activities you’re likely to do, namely diving.
Besides diving, lodging will likely be your biggest expense. Hotel
prices run the gamut in Honduras, the majority being high-budget or
low-midrange, around US$15 to US$25 per night. Budget travelers can
manage lodging for under US$12 per day in popular destinations and
under US$8 in remote areas, though the cheapest hotels can be pretty
grim.
For most travelers, eating out will cost around US$6 to US$8 per
person per meal, once drinks, taxes, and tip are added in. But you can
save money by eating at street food vendors and no-name eateries, and
G e t t i n g S t a r t e d
DON’T LEAVE HOME WITHOUT…
Passport and US cash – universal travel essentials
Sunscreen – very expensive in Honduras
Bug repellent – expensive and can be hard to find
Toiletries – you’ll appreciate having your preferred brands of tampons, pads, condoms,
deodorant, etc
Travel alarm clock – it’s rare to find alarm clocks in hotels, even high-end ones
Copies of important documents – having a copy of your passport and plane tickets will make
replacing them, if necessary, much easier
Toilet paper – an extra roll has saved many a traveler in a pinch
Diver certification card and logbook – bring them if you’ve got them. You don’t want to
repeat the Open Water course, do you?
Extra eyeglasses or contacts – expensive and difficult to replace
Large heavy-duty plastic bags – handy for travel in the rainy season, or anytime in La Moskitia
You can buy, download and
print individual chapters from
this guidebook.
Get Honduras chapters>
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